Prostate cancer: Presenter Bill Turnbull gives health update – warning signs you must know

TV presenter Bill Turnbull, 62, has said he’s feeling a lot better after finishing chemotherapy, but there’s “still a long way to go”.

The former BBC Breakfast host was diagnosed with prostate cancer earlier this year, it was revealed in February. The disease spread to his hips, pelvis and ribs, he said at the time.

But, Turnbull has now finished nine rounds of chemotherapy, and the effects are starting to wear off, he told BBC Breakfast this morning.

He urged other men to continue to check for the signs and symptoms of prostate cancer, and claimed that cancer isn’t a death sentence.

“I did nine rounds of chemotherapy, which is a bit of a grind,” said Turnbull.

“That finished a few weeks ago. The effects of the chemo are wearing off, and I feel a lot better in that respect.

“We’ve got a long way to go, but for the moment, I’m feeling okay.”

Turnbull urged other men to get checked for prostate cancer, and also revealed the main signs and symptoms.

“If you feel the warning signs – changes to the water works [urine], unexplained aches and pains that won’t go away – see a doctor.

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“Catching it easier is much better than being too late. There are new treatments coming out all the time. Getting a diagnosis isn’t the end of the world.”

Prostate cancer doesn’t usually cause any symptoms until after it’s grown large enough to put pressure on the urethra, according to the NHS.

The most common symptoms include passing more urine than normal – often during the night – and having to rush to the toilet.

Other warning signs include difficulty starting to urinate, straining, or taking a lot time to urinate.

If the cancer has spread, it could cause bone and back pain, a loss of appetite, pain in the testicles, or unexplained weight loss.

These symptoms should never be ignored, but they don’t necessarily mean you have prostate cancer.

It’s more likely to be caused by something else, such as prostate enlargement, added the NHS.

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer to be diagnosed in men, in the UK.

You’re more likely to develop the condition as you get older.

Most cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed in people over 50 years old.

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Men of African-Caribbean or African descent are also more likely to have prostate cancer.

Speak to a doctor if you’re worried about the signs or symptoms of prostate cancer.

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